Posted in Dog

KoKo’s Doggeral

At the Pearly Gates

(Inspired by a RED DOG Poem)

I stand at the gates of heaven

Making a fearful din,

“I know my mum is in there, “

“You’d better let me in.”

For years I’ve roamed Subiaco

From Rokeby Road to Townshend,

Now that I’ve traced her here,

“You’d better let me in.”

I made friends with people who fed me,

and those who took me into their home,

They kept my little tummy full,

and ensured I was not alone.

I think I’ve done with walking

I’m tired and need a rest

I want my Mum to pat me

in the haven of heaven would be best.

Posted in Ball, Dog, Holidays

Senior dogs – How to help

The first age-related loss I noted was that I could no longer hear the crackle of a packet of dog treats being opened. Then when Mum and I went to the beach. The waves crashed silently and seagulls whispered. Mum watches me trying to find her in the house by using my nose and looking in rooms and under the bed since before I’d never hesitate to come rushing to wherever she was. I’m amazed that peak hour traffic down our street is now purely a visual experience.

This loss is normal and cannot be prevented. No-one is yet making doggie hearing aids so I guess this is my life from now on. I asked Mum “why, if they can replace people’s worn out legs with artificial ones why can’t they give me a new ear?” Mum replied,” It is much more complicated KoKo, the ear has millions of little-specialised cells which can’t be easily imitated.

The second kind  of loss hit my bouncy jumping. I now take a moment to assess the height of something I am jumping u or down from. My elbows a bit arthritic but nothing too bad yet. The  vet can help with tablets while an animal physio could help with hydrotherapy or special joint exercises.

Staying warm and cosy during the colder months

Please Protect our older elbows and haunches by providing us mature dog with a comfortable bed in a protected area. A good bed makes it easier to get out of in the morning.

Making dinner time easy

Elevated feeders or pet bowls make eating and drinking more comfortable if  I have a sore back or hips.

Dog jumping
Digby jumping

Stepping it up with ease

Are steps becoming a problem at your place? Consider installing a ramp or adding middle steps. There are various DIY products which can assist and are not necessarily expensive. If your pet is a regular car traveller you can also purchase ready-made pet ramps which simply hook on to the rear of a car (wagon) when required.

Continue reading “Senior dogs – How to help”

Posted in Beach, Children, Dogs, Safety, Cottesloe Beach, Dog Health and Safety

Cottesloe Beach – KoKo

KoKo at CottesloeA Summer’s Tale

by

KoKo ShakesPaw

 

I felt the sharpness 

Of scorched grass blades

And scratchy weeds,

Where there was no shade.

 

I baked in an oven

Or an east wind blast,

Craving to find some

Cool water at last.


Bright burning glare,

Sweaty poor sleep,

Dry, dusty mouth,

Poor burnt feet!

 

Mum, Cottesloe Beach,

Can’t we go there please?

With our bathers and towels

To enjoy the cool breeze?

Posted in Dog

Toxic foods for dogs

 Shared from Puppytales.com.au by KoKo Potter

So what is the issue with grapes, raisins and sultanas for dogs?

Grapes, raisins and sultanas have been shown to cause acute renal failure (the sudden development of kidney failure) in some dogs. This finding was first identified in 1998 and by 2001 the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) Animal Poison Control Centre (APCC) had documented enough cases for it to be classed as a real syndrome. In 2003 members of the Veterinary Information Network took part in a survey and 7.4% of respondents indicated they had treated at least 1 case of grape, raisin or sultana toxicosis.

Even though there has been some research, the reason as to why some dogs develop renal failure after eating grapes, raisins and sultanas is still unknown. Further work is needed to understand the toxicity and if there are other environmental factors that cause it to occur.

Grapes and sultanas are toxic for dogs

The toxic dose

Dogs that are affected by these foods can develop kidney failure 72 hours after ingestion. But how do you know when your dog has had a toxic dose? This is the hard part, as my vet informed me some dogs can eat relatively large volumes of grapes, sultanas and raisins without any issues while other dogs can consume one or two and become ill. Estimated amounts of fresh grapes associated with kidney injury are approximately 32g or 1.1oz per kilogram of your dog’s weight. Raisins and sultanas are slightly more powerful: from 11-30g or 0.39-1.06oz per kilo of your dog’s weight. BUT a study in 2005 looked at 10 dogs who had suffered renal failure after ingesting greater than or equal to 3g (0.11oz) per kilogram of raisins or dry matter of grapes (dry matter is calculated as 20% of grape weight). As you can see there are no hard and fast rules so if you suspect your dog has ingested any grapes/raisins/sultanas call your vet.

Symptoms of Toxic food poisoning

If your dog has eaten grapes, raisins or sultanas they might have some of the following symptoms:

  • vomiting
  • diarrhea
  • not eating
  • weakness
  • abdominal pain
  • increased drinking

Clinical signs your vet may look for in a blood test include things like increased blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, phosphorus, calcium. Plus they would ask about reduced urination or no urination.

Treatment of Toxic food poisoning

If your dog has consumed these foods within the past two hours (as our dog Eddie did) your vet will most likely induce vomiting via an injection (hydrogen peroxide or apomorphine) followed by activated charcoal. If your dog has eaten a significant amount, started vomiting themselves or ingested the food several hours prior, intravenous fluid therapy might be suggested. In severe cases dialysis of the blood and peritoneal dialysismight be used to support the kidneys.

Hot Cross Buns, Fruit Cake and raisin toast are all also bad for dogsScrumptious foods like Hot Cross Buns, Fruit Cake and Raisin Toast can also be toxic for dogs

Prevention

Grapes, sultanas and raisins are popular foods in many households (ours especially) so it is best to be vigilant and ensure that your dogs do not come in contact with these foods. Don’t leave them lying around at their level or any place that they can access. I have made a new rule that my daughter now only has sultanas when we are out of the house. As for grapes she eats them at the dinner table under supervision.

But even if you have no children around the house you can easily slip up by leaving out raisin toast, fruit cake or — particularly at this time of year — a hot cross bun. So keep all these foods in your cupboard or fridge and make sure they are not shared with your four-legged loved one.

Even if your dog doesn’t get ill the stress and cost of an emergency vet trip is never a great way to spend your day.

Please note: Puppy Tales provides these articles for information purposes only. For any health problems with your pet always seek immediate veterinary advice from your local veterinarian.

Toxic foods for dogs- grapes, raisins and sultanas 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Beach, Dog, Dog Health and Safety, Dogs

Tips for overcoming water fear

Mum tried to get me to like water when I was just a puppy, but she wasn’t successful. If the weather is hot I’m a happy race down the sand slope and lower myself into the cool water but I will forever be an “armpit Swimmer” that’s as far as I’ll go! woofs from KoKo.

Tips for overcoming water fear

Greencross Vets’ Behaviour Services Manager Serena Dean gives us her top tips on helping pets overcome their fear of water.

1. Experiences

A bad experience may have prompted your pet’s fear of water. One bad experience, like not being able to find the steps to get out of the pool might make your pet fearful to try again.  Knowing what caused your pet’s fear of water can help with the training process.

2. Slow and steady

Introduce or reintroduce your pet to water in a slow and positive manner, whether this is a bath, pool or the beach. Start off at a distance from the water rewarding them for calm behaviour and slowly move forward towards the water.  Provide them with a small amount of water to stand in, just enough to cover their paws, like a kiddie pool or bath.  If you are near a body of water teach them how to get in and out.  Always start and end on a positive note, treats and games help with this.

3. Make it fun

Water games can be fun for the entire family.  Play games that involve water like fetch at the beach, running with them in the shallows or placing toys in a shallow kiddie’s pool.  Always supervise your pet around water.

4.  Don’t Force

Not all pets like going in the water.  Never force your pet to do something they are uncomfortable with and don’t throw them into a body of water.  If your pet decides they want to move away from the water, let them.

5. Teach them to swim

Contrary to popular belief not all dogs know how to swim, we need to teach them.  Start swim training in bodies of water with a gentle slope where your dog can touch the ground and slowly go out further.  Keep training sessions short by going out a little further at each session and always end with a reward.  Once they are comfortable submerging their body they may start to paddle.  Some dogs may need a little help. Floatation vests are available so your dog can feel supported.
If you’re concerned about your pet’s behaviour, speak with your Greencross Vets.
KoKo Beach
KoKo Beach