KoKo found today Monday 23rd April 2018

KoKo went missing after a tradesman left the gate open.

I searched the nearby streets and lanes, then heaps of people joined in .

We could not find any sign of him anywhere.

I was traumatised, as my best mate rarely leaves my side.

If KoKo does go on an adventure from the park he always comes back rapidly to find me.

After 12 years in Subiaco he knows where his home is.

A long two hours later I discovered he’d been kidnapped and thrown into a cage.

The man wanted a reward.

Poor KoKo was so terrified he didn’t even bark even though I had walked nearby several times.

We are so happy to be back together.

Thank you to all his human mates who helped search.

Regards Helen

PLUS Woofs from a tired KoKo

At the Estuary Beach Mandurah.

It was a cold and gusty day today with a fine drizzle of mist.

Not enough to stop Mum and I sharing a walk along the foreshore.

KoKo at the Estuary

KoKo at the Estuary

We’d enjoyed a tasty lunch with John and Alison, Anne and Helen and Mum Helen.

The best part of the lunch was that the five of us: Bro, Bonnie, Poppy and Baxter and I, of course, were allowed to sit under the table.

Luckily the humans were feeling generous. We snacked on some crumbed squid, crispy prawn tails and marina pasta!

All in all, a fun social day.

We didn’t even bark at each other.

The only naughty dog to run to another table to be some fish from an elderly couple was someone whom I won’t name!

Woofs from KoKo

Tips for overcoming water fear

Mum tried to get me to like water when I was just a puppy, but she wasn’t successful. If the weather is hot I’m a happy race down the sand slope and lower myself into the cool water but I will forever be an “armpit Swimmer” that’s as far as I’ll go! woofs from KoKo.

Tips for overcoming water fear

Greencross Vets’ Behaviour Services Manager Serena Dean gives us her top tips on helping pets overcome their fear of water.

1. Experiences

A bad experience may have prompted your pet’s fear of water. One bad experience, like not being able to find the steps to get out of the pool might make your pet fearful to try again.  Knowing what caused your pet’s fear of water can help with the training process.

2. Slow and steady

Introduce or reintroduce your pet to water in a slow and positive manner, whether this is a bath, pool or the beach. Start off at a distance from the water rewarding them for calm behaviour and slowly move forward towards the water.  Provide them with a small amount of water to stand in, just enough to cover their paws, like a kiddie pool or bath.  If you are near a body of water teach them how to get in and out.  Always start and end on a positive note, treats and games help with this.

3. Make it fun

Water games can be fun for the entire family.  Play games that involve water like fetch at the beach, running with them in the shallows or placing toys in a shallow kiddie’s pool.  Always supervise your pet around water.

4.  Don’t Force

Not all pets like going in the water.  Never force your pet to do something they are uncomfortable with and don’t throw them into a body of water.  If your pet decides they want to move away from the water, let them.

5. Teach them to swim

Contrary to popular belief not all dogs know how to swim, we need to teach them.  Start swim training in bodies of water with a gentle slope where your dog can touch the ground and slowly go out further.  Keep training sessions short by going out a little further at each session and always end with a reward.  Once they are comfortable submerging their body they may start to paddle.  Some dogs may need a little help. Floatation vests are available so your dog can feel supported.
If you’re concerned about your pet’s behaviour, speak with your Greencross Vets.

KoKo – Falling in Love

Love in the air 

One Sunday in 2014 when I was eight years of age, Mum and I walked to The Subiaco Markets as usual about 8 am. The markets are the centre of Subiaco’s social life, with stalls open Friday until Sunday. There’s always a busy and exciting atmosphere here. Over 20,000 people visit to purchase fresh fruit and socialise. Many come via the train which is healthy for the environment. We do not like car pollution in our suburb.

We stroll the kilometre from our home along the curving pathways through Mueller and Kitchener Parks enjoying the crunch and crackle of the crispy red, yellow and orange leaves when I stray onto the grassy verge. I know from this sound that it’s autumn here in Western Australia, my favourite time of the year. The air today smells crisp and fresh with none of the drying heat that is summer.  I detect a slight tinge of moisture but no rain is falling. When I look up I see the tree branches are bare. White fluffy clouds scatter across the blue panorama above me. I’m in my element with all my senses engaging.

My paws slip in muddy patches of damp decaying leaves which then release the moist and fertile smell of the earth beneath. My human Mum says I look like a black-footed Potoroo! (That’s like a type of baby kangaroo that has sooty black paws).

There is no hint during our thirty-minute promenade that an interruption will occur in our usual routine after we arrive at the Markets. Nor do we receive any atmospheric flashes to warn us that a remarkable event is about to occur and change my life forever.

When we arrive at the markets my human Mum and I head to the Pappadams stall if we have a craving for a tasty Turkish Pide or delicious Dahl. On other Sundays, if we need a sugar surge, we rush straight to the French Patisserie to buy a crunchy croissant. Val, my friend who sells creamy milk and yoghurt, always lets me have a cup of milk while she minds me. My staying at Val’s stall leaves Mum free to select her veggies without me getting squashed by the many feet.

After smacking my lips, I’m still wearing a white moustache on my furry lip. I bark politely “Mmmmm – more please Val?” This congenial human cannot resist my pleading deep, brown eyes. She gives in and pours me another cup of milk. I’m sitting now with a warm, contented tummy contemplating the routine of our lives.

Mum returns to collect me, takes my lead and we walk together between big and little humans, prams with babies, and humans with big back packs overflowing with vegetables, towards the flower stall. I look up through the crowd and spy an unusual shape on the counter. It moves a little and I realise what it is. There among the vases of yellow wattle and native orange banksia, is the most beautiful girl dog I’ve ever seen. She is tiny and cute, and a wee bit flirtatious.

With no warning, my chest feels tight; my heart beat goes into overdrive. These sensations are a new feeling for me. “What’s happening?” I wonder. “Am I having a heart attack?” This health tragedy is unlikely as I’m not in a high-risk category. Mum feeds me healthy food and only gives me small pieces of treats. We exercise daily, and of course, I don’t smoke or drink alcohol. My doggie parents are still living energetic lives. What then is this pain stabbing me deep in my chest?

I let out a soft “Yip, Yip” bark to let Mum know something is wrong. She looks down at me through all the legs and can see I’m thin with concern, my ears folded back, and my eyes wide with fear. I’m pitifully anxious and trembling from my little black nose to my fluffy apricot tail.

For a moment, Mum panics thinking I’m ill again. Our last trip to the animal doctor was for an emergency after I’d eaten a poisonous Blowfish at Cottesloe Beach. My life was close to fading for 24 hours. The treatment cost Mum lots of money. Her greatest fear though was not the expense, but the thought of losing me, her best mate.

A dose of medicine forced me to throw up the fish. The doctor then forced black charcoal down my throat. Mum said I looked utterly miserable sitting on newspapers waiting for the medicine to work. If the situation was not so tragic she would have laughed. Luckily, I’m a resilient little dog and lived to tell you the tale.

But back now to a more cheerful event that is unfolding here at the markets.

Mum follows my eye-gaze upwards from human sock level to see what’s catching my attention. It doesn’t take her long to notice I’m staring at the flower stall. A grin creeps across her face, and she relaxes, as the problem becomes clear to her. “Don’t worry, Koko. Your heart is ok. I think you are feeling strange because ………… you are falling in love! We both continue to look at the flower stall counter. I hang my head as blood flows from my heart to spread warmth across my face. If I was less furry, you might have seen me blush!

So, this is what love feels like, I think. What have I been missing all these years? If it’s true love is born in the most unusual places then this is it. At last, at the age of eight, I’ve met a female dog whom I may grow to love more than myself.

Mum is kind and lets me stay with my new love for a while. Bella and I keep staring at each other and panting softly together. Yipping quietly we tell each other a little of our backgrounds. We reveal the usual parts of our lives that humans also talk about when starting to get to know a new companion: our ages, where we live, how we spend our days and who the humans are who care for us.

Mum comes back to collect me carrying a bottle of Val’s creamy milk for our breakfasts the following week. Bella and I say our farewells with a little nose kiss and Mum and I head off back home. This time we walk down Rokeby Road, the main street of Subiaco so we can greet all the humans and dogs we know. Weekends are very social in our suburb.

Of course, we stop at a café to have our coffee. We call mine a Puppicino, but in truth, it’s the milky froth off the top of Mum’s Cappuccino. I’m allowed five fingers of the bubbles “One, two, three four and “Last one””. People at the cafes laugh, they think I’m spoiled, and they’re right!

The following Sunday Mum I wake Mum from her deep sleep with a tap of my paw on her shoulder. I’m anxious to get to the markets. Through bleary eyes Mum looks at the clock and says “KoKo it’s only 4 am. Please go back to sleep.

I keep tapping on her shoulder, barking persistently “Woof, Woof, Mum …… let’s go to the markets, please. Let’s go to the markets NOW”. Mum convinces me to go back to sleep with a promise we will go when they open at 8 am.

As soon as we arrive at the markets, I drag Mum directly to the flower stall. My collar is almost choking me, Mum can’t keep up with my desperate pace. I’m relieved to see Bella is here again, looking gorgeous. We curl our bodies together on the counter generating a warm glow in each of our hearts. Our pleasant companionship goes on in this manner every Sunday for a beautiful year. Sometimes our Mums let us go for a walk together along a few of the many laneways that bisect the Subiaco streets. We sniff Wee-Mails together and just enjoy our time as we walk slowly sharing the growing ease between us. We both look forward to our time together each weekend. our hearts are bursting with love.

When the Station Street Markets close in 2015, we did not get a chance to say farewell. It shatters my heart when Mum revealed to me that I would never see my lovely Bella again. Our happy memories will sustain Bella and me in harder times. We will not forget our joyful interactions.

It is best, I hear, to experience love and lose it than to have never loved at all. Having fallen in love so completely and unexpectedly, I totally agree with this sentiment.

May you all find love in the world somewhere and treasure the experience when you do.

Woofs from

KoKo Harry Potter

(Via Helen Potter)

A Warning about Dogs, grapes, sultanas and raisins – KoKo

Courtesy of Puppy Tales

Grapes, raisins and sultanas may cause acute renal failure (the sudden development of kidney failure) in some dogs.

Even though there has been some research, the reason as to why some dogs develop renal failure after eating grapes, raisins and sultanas is still unknown. Further work is needed to understand the toxicity and if there are other environmental factors that cause it to occur.

The toxic dose

Dogs that are affected by these foods can develop kidney failure 72 hours after ingestion. some dogs can eat relatively large volumes of grapes, sultanas and raisins without any issues while other dogs can consume one or two and become ill. Estimated amounts of fresh grapes associated with kidney injury are approximately 32g or 1.1oz per kilogram of your dog’s weight. Raisins and sultanas are slightly more powerful: from 11-30g or 0.39-1.06oz per kilo of your dog’s weight.

If you suspect your dog has ingested any grapes/raisins/sultanas call your vet.

Symptoms

If your dog has eaten grapes, raisins or sultanas they might have some of the following symptoms:

  • vomiting
  • diarrhea
  • not eating
  • weakness
  • abdominal pain
  • increased drinking

Treatment

If your dog has consumed these foods within the past two hours your vet will most likely induce vomiting via an injection (hydrogen peroxide or apomorphine) followed by activated charcoal. If your dog has eaten a significant amount, started vomiting themselves or ingested the food several hours prior, intravenous fluid therapy might be suggested. In severe cases dialysis of the blood and peritoneal dialysis might be used to support the kidneys.

Prevention

Grapes, sultanas and raisins are popular foods in many households so it is best to be vigilant and ensure that your dogs do not come in contact with these foods. Don’t leave them lying around at their level or any place that they can access.

Even if your dog doesn’t get ill the stress and cost of an emergency vet trip is never a great way to spend your day.

Please note: Puppy Tales provides these articles for information purposes only. For any health problems with your pet always seek immediate veterinary advice from your local veterinarian.

KoKo and Dog mates

KoKo and Dog mates

I have been staying with my doggie mates at Mandurah again. Bro and Bonnie kept me company on walks in the park and down to the cafe every morning. Of course John and Alison, their humans, had to hold our leads.

“Spill the Beans” Cafe at Seacrest is very popular with the local dogs as the cafe sells tasty treats for us. We are lucky dogs.

At night us “Three Amigos” play “Musical Beds”, thinking that someone else’s bed is likely to be more comfortable. Some nights I creep out of my bed and lay on the floor nearer to John. He is surprised to find me in this spot in the mornings.

I always race back speedily to John when he calls me at the park, as he has an endless supply of doggie treats in his pocket.

Even though I enjoy staying with my mates nothing beats the joy of seeing my Human Mum at the door. All three of us leap over her as she arrives at the door. We slather her with kisses. I let out a sharp bark and run to our car. I stand next to the door barking loudly to ensure Mum knows I want to go back to my home in Subiaco.

Thank you John and Alison for your care and cuddles. Woofs from KoKo

Dogs Leighton Beach WA

We had a lovely morning at Leighton Dog Beach today. The sun was shining and the water was crystal clear and just a pleasant temperature for my little dip. As usual

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Yogi

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A Ball Watcher

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Sammy – My playmate

there were lots and lots of doggies having fun chasing balls in and out of the ocean. I made good friends with Sammy a relative type of dog and met a 58kg dog called Yogi. Wow, he was big and black and almost seven times my size. Here are some photos my Mum took.

Dogs at Leighton Beach NY Day

There were lots and lots of doggies playing on the beach on New Year’s Day. I had a little swim and a long walk. I was so hot I tried to sneak into someone’s blue tent for some shade. Of course, I also conned some girls into giving me pats! That’s me in the last photo. It was a fun morning. Woofs from KoKo

 

Secret Life of Australian Cat and Dog Owners

THE SECRET LIFE OF AUSTRALIAN PET OWNERS written by Pawshake 2016

I love secrets! That’s why I spend so much time reading WeeMails left for me by my doggie friends. I discover where my mates are, whether they are going for walks, and of course, The WeeMails tell me all the neighbourhood gossip. This includes who is new to Subiaco, who needs me to visit because they live behind a high fence and are lonely, and if there are any new cats in the area I need to avoid.

Here are some secret Pawshake discovered about cat and dog owners.

Research reveals 87.5 per cent of Australians love their pets so much they would give up their dream home for them

Pawshake research reveals that being a pet owner has a significant impact on life choices and behaviours – from home living and the local community – to social lives and relationships.

KoKo and a loving friend Subiaco

KoKo and a loving friend in Subiaco

Pets vs. Home – real estate agents take note

In addition to Australia facing soaring housing prices and rising rent making it difficult to look for a place to live, Australians are still willing to factor in one other priority – their pets. A survey released today by pet-sitting community Pawshake has found that 87.5 per cent of Australians wouldn’t rent or buy their dream home if it didn’t allow their beloved pets.

Pet vs. Family – watch out kids

Revealing Australia’s love for our furry friends, the survey also looks into the habits of pet owners in the context of family life at home. Surprisingly, two-thirds (67 per cent) of Australians would choose a pet over a child if they could only afford one or the other.

Australians also seem more forgiving of their pet than their child, with 77.5 per cent admitting they would be angrier at their child than their pet for ruining a piece of furniture at home. More than half (59 percent) also admitted they would feel guiltier if they forgot to feed their pet than their child.

Dog with Animal Physio Leigh

Dog with Animal Physio Leigh

Pets vs. Neighbours – knock-knock, who’s there?

The love for pets doesn’t stop there with 74.9 per cent of Australians saying they would recognise a neighbours’ pet before they would their neighbour and seven in ten (70.3 per cent) going on to say there are pets in their neighbourhood whose name they know and who’s owner’s name they don’t know.

Not only are pets included as part of the neighbourhood, they’re also included in life’s milestones, with 67.7 percent of pet owners signing greeting cards for their pet and over half (57.7 percent) going as far as imagining their dog’s voice!

James, Lucy, Julie ,Sheila, Alma, Richard, Helen

James, Lucy, Julie ,Sheila, Alma, Richard, Helen

Pets vs. Health – are you calling my pet fat?

It seems that pet owners care for their pets so much that almost nine in ten (87.7 per cent) take their pet to the vet more than they would take themselves to the doctor. This care for their pets’ well-being is further evident when it comes to how their pets look, with half (50.5 percent) of pet owners admitting they are sensitive to any comments other people make about the weight of their pet.

Pets vs. Social Life – it’s not you, it’s my dog

The influence of one’s pet is also prevalent in pet owners’ social lives with almost all (95.9 percent) willing to sacrifice treating themselves in favour of treating their pets, from a meal to a night out and from a haircut to new clothes if needed. 78.5 percent also admitted they would put their pet before their love life and stop dating someone if they discovered they weren’t a pet lover.

However, the influence of pets on the lives of Australian’s dogs stop at the haircut. Contrary to popular stereotyping (and to our disappointment), only 8.6 percent of people have admitted they have had or currently have a similar hairstyle to their pet.

Photo of groomer and KoKo

KoKo looking glamorous – with my groomer Michelle

1,125 Australian pet owners responded to this survey in November 2016.

by Pawshake – a trusted community of pet lovers.