A Warning about Dogs, grapes, sultanas and raisins – KoKo

Courtesy of Puppy Tales

Grapes, raisins and sultanas may cause acute renal failure (the sudden development of kidney failure) in some dogs.

Even though there has been some research, the reason as to why some dogs develop renal failure after eating grapes, raisins and sultanas is still unknown. Further work is needed to understand the toxicity and if there are other environmental factors that cause it to occur.

The toxic dose

Dogs that are affected by these foods can develop kidney failure 72 hours after ingestion. some dogs can eat relatively large volumes of grapes, sultanas and raisins without any issues while other dogs can consume one or two and become ill. Estimated amounts of fresh grapes associated with kidney injury are approximately 32g or 1.1oz per kilogram of your dog’s weight. Raisins and sultanas are slightly more powerful: from 11-30g or 0.39-1.06oz per kilo of your dog’s weight.

If you suspect your dog has ingested any grapes/raisins/sultanas call your vet.

Symptoms

If your dog has eaten grapes, raisins or sultanas they might have some of the following symptoms:

  • vomiting
  • diarrhea
  • not eating
  • weakness
  • abdominal pain
  • increased drinking

Treatment

If your dog has consumed these foods within the past two hours your vet will most likely induce vomiting via an injection (hydrogen peroxide or apomorphine) followed by activated charcoal. If your dog has eaten a significant amount, started vomiting themselves or ingested the food several hours prior, intravenous fluid therapy might be suggested. In severe cases dialysis of the blood and peritoneal dialysis might be used to support the kidneys.

Prevention

Grapes, sultanas and raisins are popular foods in many households so it is best to be vigilant and ensure that your dogs do not come in contact with these foods. Don’t leave them lying around at their level or any place that they can access.

Even if your dog doesn’t get ill the stress and cost of an emergency vet trip is never a great way to spend your day.

Please note: Puppy Tales provides these articles for information purposes only. For any health problems with your pet always seek immediate veterinary advice from your local veterinarian.

KoKo feeling ill

Oh dear, I feel awful, my tummy is tense with pain, I feel as if I might throw up (again) and I am not my usual bright self.

Mum thinks I ate too much last night. I kept yelling at her to give me more food.

Or maybe I found something at Leighton Beach when she was not looking.

Whatever it was, the short enjoyment I might have felt is in the past. I feel dreadful.

So when Mum took me to my favourite park and I would not even check my Wee-mails, she knew I was not pretending.

After two injections from the vet, including a painkiller, I am still not feeling well. Even peaceful sleep won’t come to me.

I hope that I can write to you tomorrow and tell you all is well.

 

I am not well

I am not well

(Certainly, Mum’s  wallet is not very well either!)

Woofs from a miserable KoKo

What to do if I eat chocolate?

Chocolate contains theobromine and caffeine, which in larger amounts is especially dangerous because pets can’t break it down and eliminate it the same way humans can. It can build up to toxic concentrations and cause multi-organ disease and failure if not treated properly.

What symptoms will you see if your doggie mate eats chocolate this Easter?

Symptoms will occur from four to 24 hours after your pet has eaten chocolate and will vary depending on the amount of chocolate (theobromine) your dog has eaten. Dr Lui says, ” theobromine mainly affects the heart, central nervous system, and kidneys. Theobromine is a toxin that links to hyperactivity. Death can occur.”

Symptoms of eating chocolate are:

  • Rapid breathing
  • Muscle tension, incoordination
  • Increased heart rate
  • Blood in vomit
  • Tremors,
  • Seizure
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhoea.

KoKo’s personal tale about chocolate

If I eat chocolate, then you need to take me to the vet. The doctor will force charcoal down my throat and make me throw up (just like they did when I ate a blowfish!). They may also give intravenous fluids (a drip), medication to control heart rate, blood pressure and seizure activity.
“I WILL NOT EAT CHOCOLATE” I keep repeating this phrase if I find my Mum Helen’s stash. I do not want to sit on newspaper and be made to throw up. Sadly I know from experience that if I find a special treat I will forget all the vet’s warnings. So I keep reminding myself “I WILL NOT EAT CHOCOLATE.”
Luckily, with prompt intervention and treatment, even in dogs that have eaten large amounts of chocolate, the prognosis for a poisoned dog is usually good. If you thick that your pet has eaten chocolate, contact your nearest Vet urgently for treatment.
Edited from Greencross Vets <foryour@pethealth.greencrossvets.com.au>

Vet24HrDogs New Year’s Eve

My Mum Helen took photos of animals waiting for the Vet on New Year’s Eve. They should have been out partying but they were ill and needed attention.

It’s summer – please keep us doggies cool

Tips to Keep Your Dog Cool (courtesy of Wembley Vet Clinic)

  • Fresh water and shade are the most important things to provide relief from the heat.
  • Have 2 or more water bowls around the house in case one is knocked over.
  • Try filling small plastic paddling pools with fresh water.  Some dogs love to have a dip in the heat of the day and cool off.
  • Fill soft drink bottles with water and freeze them overnight then put it in the dog kennel.
  • Dogs will love to lay on them or lick them to keep cool
  • Hair cuts can also help to keep you long haired pets cool.  shaved to get rid of their thick coats
  • Dogs and cats cant sweat through the skin – only the pads on the feet and dogs pant to cool down
  • Fill up an ice cream container with water and add a little Vegemite to flavour it.  Pop in 1-2 dog treats.  Freeze overnight and then give it to your dog in the middle of the day – they love to lick the ice and will help keep them occupied.
Koko cool drink at the beach

Koko cool drink at the beach

Oh No! Off to the vet again

It’s not really too bad going to see Greg the vet now that I am older.

Today I even tried to jump the queue and rushed into the consulting room when I spied him as he opened the consulting room door. He said “KoKo please sit down, it is not your turn yet.So I turned a little red and slunk back to the floor to wait.

No dog likes the private treatment Greg has to give me for my itchy bottom BBut I felt much more comfortable afterwards.

Thank you, Greg.

While we were waiting at the Vets we met this wise looking fellow called Ralph.

Woofs from KoKo

Ralph at the Subiaco Vet

Ralph at the Subiaco Vet

Poisonous plants for dogs to avoid

Thank you to Wembley Vet Clinic for this handy information.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

KoKo waiting his Puppicino at Floyds Cafe

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  1. Azaleas and rhododendrons contain toxins that may cause vomiting, diarrhoea, coma, and potentially even death.
  2. Tulip and daffodil bulbs cause serious stomach problems, convulsions, and increased heart rate.
  3. Cycads are highly toxic. A single seed may result in vomiting, seizures and liver failure – usually irreversible.
  4. Cape lilac berries are toxic to dogs (and people).  GI upsets like nausea, drooling, appetite loss, vomiting, belly pain, and diarrhoea. Also lethargy and weakness and a “drunken” or wobbly gait. With severe intoxications, changes to their breathing, heartbeat, tremors, collapse and seizures.
  5. Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow, is a popular hedging plant in WA with purple flowers that fade too white.  If eaten it can cause muscle spasms, convulsions similar to strychnine poisoning and could potentially cause death within just a few hours.   when pruning every leaf and stem should be discarded.
  6. Wandering Jew is a common weed and ground cover in WA gardens. It can cause significant skin irritation and a nasty rash.

    So… don’t nibble your Mum or Dad’s plants or you may become very sick.

Dog food is much more tasty and healthy too. KoKo Potter

Oh, Oh – it’s teeth cleaning time – KoKo

August is Pet Dental Month
Wembley Veterinary Hospital has some good advice in their newsletter which I would like to share with you. Their news is in “commas” whereas my comments are in sloping writing – KoKo

“Dental disease is one of the most common conditions affecting pets. It can cause bad breath, pain and difficulty eating or chewing. If left untreated it can lead to infections, loss of teeth, abscesses and can even cause infections in other parts of the body.”

“The best way to prevent Dental disease is to start early, and not wait until your Pet already has signs of disease.”

Whoops I already have one bad tooth, but I am 10 and a half years old, so I have done pretty well I think! – KoKo

“Preventative measures like encouraging your dog to chew and use their teeth for what they are designed to do is ideal. You can use dental chews or raw meaty bones to make up about 20% of their diet. They allow them to chew or tear material from the food, which is good for their teeth, and helps to occupy them when they at home during the day.”

“It is important that the bone is raw and meaty. Some people use bones that are just large slabs of hard long bone. These are often too fatty so can upset tummies, and they are generally TOO HARD and can cause tooth fractures.”

I agree with Dr Garry Edgar. My tummy felt very dizzy the next day, and rumbled and tumbled, after eating a fatty bone. (and, sorry for the gory detail, but I also have runny poos that are not nice)- KoKo.

“The best bones are big enough to not completely fit in your Dog’s or Cat’s mouth, as well as malleable and meaty to force them to use effort to chew. Things like chicken, turkey or lamb necks are ideal.”

Yummy, Yummy – KoKo

“If your Dog or Cat won’t chew meaty bone, then some pet foods can help to force them to chew. Eukanuba contains phosphorous crystals to help scrub their teeth, while a biscuit like Hills T/D has a matrix of fibre to make them chew and break the biscuits up before being swallowed. Or use one of the dental mouthwashes or gels, or brush your Pets’ teeth!”

“What if it’s too late and your pet is suffering from significant dental disease? Wembley Veterinary Hospital can help! Tartar build up can be removed by an ultrasonic scaler, just like when you go to the dentist, and once clean, all the teeth can be thoroughly examined and any diseased teeth can be extracted. The procedure is under general anaesthetic and is a day procedure, so your pet will go home the same day with beautiful fresh breath.”

Here is my doggie mate Digby showing his teeth

Dig by showing his teeth


Digby showing his teeth

and this is me

KoKo's teeth (while having a hair grooming session!)


KoKo’s teeth (while having a hair grooming session!)

“Once the teeth are all clean, Gary Edgar and his team can plan a preventative regime to keep your pet’s teeth clean and sparkling for as long as possible. This may involve brushing, dental diets, increasing chewing (on raw meaty bones or chew treats such as Greenies.”

  • these are both my favourites KoKo)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brushing your pet’s teeth regularly is the ideal way of keeping them clean, but remember not to use human toothpaste, as this is not safe for your pet to swallow. There are also plenty of options for those pets who are not so keen on having their teeth brushed.”

My human Mum Helen knows something – she told me I should let her clean my teeth. As usual, I was a bit dogmatic and refused. Now I have one bad tooth that is about to fall out. I’m sure it will be easier if I sleep while the vet removes it before it puts me off my food (that would be a disaster – you all know I love my food!!) – KoKo

Sentences in italics are KoKo’s© 2016 Helen Potter

The article is Copyright © 2016 Wembley Veterinary Hospital

Can you understand me?

Thanks to Dr Greg from Subiaco Vet for some more tips!

 When I wag my tail – I am smiling!  But, if my tail is high and wagging slowly, I am feeling confident and friendly, whereas if I hold my tail low and wag it rapidly, it means i am a little nervous.
 When I am scooting or dragging my bottom on the ground I am itchy and probably have blocked anal glands. Mum knows to take me to Dr Greg.
 Licking – Most common reasons for licking ourselves and other dogs is that they taste good, and we are trying to show affection
 WHen you arrive home and I bring you a toy I am giving you a gift that I think you will like. It is a sign of my affection.

KoKo

Koko Nik Natanui

Thank you Greg for putting my photo in your newsletter. Everyone knows I am a keen Eagles supporter.