Bushfire Pets Yarloop area – Pawsome Tales of Escape and Survival

My Mum Helen and I are starting an exciting new project. Here is the Post we put up on the Waroona Vets site:

May 12th 2017  

KoKo Rolling

KoKo Rolling

 

Expression of Interest request to Yarloop residents and Waroona vet staff. 


My human Mum Helen loves taking doggie photos. She also helps me write my blog about my mates in Subiaco.

We were very sad to hear of all the pets at Yarloop who were caught up in the bushfire last year and of those who had to move to new locations.

Mum and I collected lots of beds, food and toys and dropped them off at Waroona Vet when we heard the news. We hope you found our gifts from Subiaco dog owners helpful.

Mum and I would like to visit Yarloop (or wherever you are now located) to record some tales about how your pets survived and how they have recovered now.

Of course, Helen will take some cute photos. We could maybe have a small exhibition later, and even, if all goes well, – a book!.

As many of you know, I tend to write from my own doggie viewpoint. The tales you discuss with us will have the same flavour.

If your pet can communicate how he/she felt, or how you think they may have coped, they could tell their tale through you. 

Do you feel ok about talking to us so that we can record your stories?

Some of you will have lost so much, we don’t want to intrude. 


Please leave a comment on my blog here or email potter.helen@iinet.net.au

I have set up a closed group site on facebook. Animal Tales of a Bushfire

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1355507784528568/

I’m not sure how this works? But if we become friends then I can invite you to join the group I think.

 

Many thanks, Helen Potter Photographer and woofs from KoKo Potter

 

What to do if I eat chocolate?

Chocolate contains theobromine and caffeine, which in larger amounts is especially dangerous because pets can’t break it down and eliminate it the same way humans can. It can build up to toxic concentrations and cause multi-organ disease and failure if not treated properly.

What symptoms will you see if your doggie mate eats chocolate this Easter?

Symptoms will occur from four to 24 hours after your pet has eaten chocolate and will vary depending on the amount of chocolate (theobromine) your dog has eaten. Dr Lui says, ” theobromine mainly affects the heart, central nervous system, and kidneys. Theobromine is a toxin that links to hyperactivity. Death can occur.”

Symptoms of eating chocolate are:

  • Rapid breathing
  • Muscle tension, incoordination
  • Increased heart rate
  • Blood in vomit
  • Tremors,
  • Seizure
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhoea.

KoKo’s personal tale about chocolate

If I eat chocolate, then you need to take me to the vet. The doctor will force charcoal down my throat and make me throw up (just like they did when I ate a blowfish!). They may also give intravenous fluids (a drip), medication to control heart rate, blood pressure and seizure activity.
“I WILL NOT EAT CHOCOLATE” I keep repeating this phrase if I find my Mum Helen’s stash. I do not want to sit on newspaper and be made to throw up. Sadly I know from experience that if I find a special treat I will forget all the vet’s warnings. So I keep reminding myself “I WILL NOT EAT CHOCOLATE.”
Luckily, with prompt intervention and treatment, even in dogs that have eaten large amounts of chocolate, the prognosis for a poisoned dog is usually good. If you thick that your pet has eaten chocolate, contact your nearest Vet urgently for treatment.
Edited from Greencross Vets <foryour@pethealth.greencrossvets.com.au>

Vet24HrDogs New Year’s Eve

My Mum Helen took photos of animals waiting for the Vet on New Year’s Eve. They should have been out partying but they were ill and needed attention.

Oh No! Off to the vet again

It’s not really too bad going to see Greg the vet now that I am older.

Today I even tried to jump the queue and rushed into the consulting room when I spied him as he opened the consulting room door. He said “KoKo please sit down, it is not your turn yet.So I turned a little red and slunk back to the floor to wait.

No dog likes the private treatment Greg has to give me for my itchy bottom BBut I felt much more comfortable afterwards.

Thank you, Greg.

While we were waiting at the Vets we met this wise looking fellow called Ralph.

Woofs from KoKo

Ralph at the Subiaco Vet

Ralph at the Subiaco Vet

Oh, Oh – it’s teeth cleaning time – KoKo

August is Pet Dental Month
Wembley Veterinary Hospital has some good advice in their newsletter which I would like to share with you. Their news is in “commas” whereas my comments are in sloping writing – KoKo

“Dental disease is one of the most common conditions affecting pets. It can cause bad breath, pain and difficulty eating or chewing. If left untreated it can lead to infections, loss of teeth, abscesses and can even cause infections in other parts of the body.”

“The best way to prevent Dental disease is to start early, and not wait until your Pet already has signs of disease.”

Whoops I already have one bad tooth, but I am 10 and a half years old, so I have done pretty well I think! – KoKo

“Preventative measures like encouraging your dog to chew and use their teeth for what they are designed to do is ideal. You can use dental chews or raw meaty bones to make up about 20% of their diet. They allow them to chew or tear material from the food, which is good for their teeth, and helps to occupy them when they at home during the day.”

“It is important that the bone is raw and meaty. Some people use bones that are just large slabs of hard long bone. These are often too fatty so can upset tummies, and they are generally TOO HARD and can cause tooth fractures.”

I agree with Dr Garry Edgar. My tummy felt very dizzy the next day, and rumbled and tumbled, after eating a fatty bone. (and, sorry for the gory detail, but I also have runny poos that are not nice)- KoKo.

“The best bones are big enough to not completely fit in your Dog’s or Cat’s mouth, as well as malleable and meaty to force them to use effort to chew. Things like chicken, turkey or lamb necks are ideal.”

Yummy, Yummy – KoKo

“If your Dog or Cat won’t chew meaty bone, then some pet foods can help to force them to chew. Eukanuba contains phosphorous crystals to help scrub their teeth, while a biscuit like Hills T/D has a matrix of fibre to make them chew and break the biscuits up before being swallowed. Or use one of the dental mouthwashes or gels, or brush your Pets’ teeth!”

“What if it’s too late and your pet is suffering from significant dental disease? Wembley Veterinary Hospital can help! Tartar build up can be removed by an ultrasonic scaler, just like when you go to the dentist, and once clean, all the teeth can be thoroughly examined and any diseased teeth can be extracted. The procedure is under general anaesthetic and is a day procedure, so your pet will go home the same day with beautiful fresh breath.”

Here is my doggie mate Digby showing his teeth

Dig by showing his teeth


Digby showing his teeth

and this is me

KoKo's teeth (while having a hair grooming session!)


KoKo’s teeth (while having a hair grooming session!)

“Once the teeth are all clean, Gary Edgar and his team can plan a preventative regime to keep your pet’s teeth clean and sparkling for as long as possible. This may involve brushing, dental diets, increasing chewing (on raw meaty bones or chew treats such as Greenies.”

  • these are both my favourites KoKo)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brushing your pet’s teeth regularly is the ideal way of keeping them clean, but remember not to use human toothpaste, as this is not safe for your pet to swallow. There are also plenty of options for those pets who are not so keen on having their teeth brushed.”

My human Mum Helen knows something – she told me I should let her clean my teeth. As usual, I was a bit dogmatic and refused. Now I have one bad tooth that is about to fall out. I’m sure it will be easier if I sleep while the vet removes it before it puts me off my food (that would be a disaster – you all know I love my food!!) – KoKo

Sentences in italics are KoKo’s© 2016 Helen Potter

The article is Copyright © 2016 Wembley Veterinary Hospital

Don’t let me get fat over winter please

Tips from Dr Greg from Subiaco Vet Clinic

 Feed only the recommended pet food, with no other leftovers, scraps, snacks or treats
 Wiegh me regulatly and record results, ideally charting progress over time
 Ensure that only one person feeds me
 Get a new, smaller feed bowl
 Always measure the food using scales or a cup measure
 Feed on a little and often basis, dividing the food into 2 to 4 meals
 Remove any uneaten food after ten to fifteen minutes
 Exercise and play are better rewards than food!

Thanks  Dr Greg – KoKo

Winter Warnings and Advice on Aging from Wembley Veterinary Hospital

Old age creaks

Old age creaks

Aging How does ageing affect older pets?  As a cat or dog ages, two common changes can occur. The first are age-related changes such as hearing loss, changes in vision or reduced activity.  These are normal and cannot be prevented.

The second kind is related to what we would class as disease. Commonly this would include heart disease, liver disease, kidney disease, arthritis or dental disease. Often, these types of diseases can start to develop slowly, so we often make excuses or allowances for our pets getting old and miss the warning signs. The signs to look out for can include things like weight gain or loss, changes in water intake or urine output, smelly breath or difficulty chewing, increase or decrease in appetite and changes in activity levels or sleeping more than normal.

Comments from KoKo

“I’ve already told my Mum that i don’t want a CAT scan when I get older. I am scared of cats and don’t see why I should have a cat charge Mum a lot of money for just walking around me in a circle.”

“I’m not having any LAB tests either. I hear that Labrador are not all that clever so I doubt it would be worthwhile paying for their opinion. (sorry to offend any Labs!)” KoKo

Snail Pellet Poisoning

The first rains of spring often bring out that first flush of snails into the garden. Snail pellets are highly toxic and can kill Dogs and Cats by causing muscle excitement, salivation and seizures. Take care of you dog when he/she is out walking as well as in your own yard.