A Warning about Dogs, grapes, sultanas and raisins – KoKo

Courtesy of Puppy Tales

Grapes, raisins and sultanas may cause acute renal failure (the sudden development of kidney failure) in some dogs.

Even though there has been some research, the reason as to why some dogs develop renal failure after eating grapes, raisins and sultanas is still unknown. Further work is needed to understand the toxicity and if there are other environmental factors that cause it to occur.

The toxic dose

Dogs that are affected by these foods can develop kidney failure 72 hours after ingestion. some dogs can eat relatively large volumes of grapes, sultanas and raisins without any issues while other dogs can consume one or two and become ill. Estimated amounts of fresh grapes associated with kidney injury are approximately 32g or 1.1oz per kilogram of your dog’s weight. Raisins and sultanas are slightly more powerful: from 11-30g or 0.39-1.06oz per kilo of your dog’s weight.

If you suspect your dog has ingested any grapes/raisins/sultanas call your vet.

Symptoms

If your dog has eaten grapes, raisins or sultanas they might have some of the following symptoms:

  • vomiting
  • diarrhea
  • not eating
  • weakness
  • abdominal pain
  • increased drinking

Treatment

If your dog has consumed these foods within the past two hours your vet will most likely induce vomiting via an injection (hydrogen peroxide or apomorphine) followed by activated charcoal. If your dog has eaten a significant amount, started vomiting themselves or ingested the food several hours prior, intravenous fluid therapy might be suggested. In severe cases dialysis of the blood and peritoneal dialysis might be used to support the kidneys.

Prevention

Grapes, sultanas and raisins are popular foods in many households so it is best to be vigilant and ensure that your dogs do not come in contact with these foods. Don’t leave them lying around at their level or any place that they can access.

Even if your dog doesn’t get ill the stress and cost of an emergency vet trip is never a great way to spend your day.

Please note: Puppy Tales provides these articles for information purposes only. For any health problems with your pet always seek immediate veterinary advice from your local veterinarian.

KoKo feeling ill

Oh dear, I feel awful, my tummy is tense with pain, I feel as if I might throw up (again) and I am not my usual bright self.

Mum thinks I ate too much last night. I kept yelling at her to give me more food.

Or maybe I found something at Leighton Beach when she was not looking.

Whatever it was, the short enjoyment I might have felt is in the past. I feel dreadful.

So when Mum took me to my favourite park and I would not even check my Wee-mails, she knew I was not pretending.

After two injections from the vet, including a painkiller, I am still not feeling well. Even peaceful sleep won’t come to me.

I hope that I can write to you tomorrow and tell you all is well.

 

I am not well

I am not well

(Certainly, Mum’s  wallet is not very well either!)

Woofs from a miserable KoKo

Bushfire Pets Yarloop area – Pawsome Tales of Escape and Survival

My Mum Helen and I are starting an exciting new project. Here is the Post we put up on the Waroona Vets site:

May 12th 2017  

KoKo Rolling

KoKo Rolling

 

Expression of Interest request to Yarloop residents and Waroona vet staff. 


My human Mum Helen loves taking doggie photos. She also helps me write my blog about my mates in Subiaco.

We were very sad to hear of all the pets at Yarloop who were caught up in the bushfire last year and of those who had to move to new locations.

Mum and I collected lots of beds, food and toys and dropped them off at Waroona Vet when we heard the news. We hope you found our gifts from Subiaco dog owners helpful.

Mum and I would like to visit Yarloop (or wherever you are now located) to record some tales about how your pets survived and how they have recovered now.

Of course, Helen will take some cute photos. We could maybe have a small exhibition later, and even, if all goes well, – a book!.

As many of you know, I tend to write from my own doggie viewpoint. The tales you discuss with us will have the same flavour.

If your pet can communicate how he/she felt, or how you think they may have coped, they could tell their tale through you. 

Do you feel ok about talking to us so that we can record your stories?

Some of you will have lost so much, we don’t want to intrude. 


Please leave a comment on my blog here or email potter.helen@iinet.net.au

I have set up a closed group site on facebook. Animal Tales of a Bushfire

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1355507784528568/

I’m not sure how this works? But if we become friends then I can invite you to join the group I think.

 

Many thanks, Helen Potter Photographer and woofs from KoKo Potter

 

What to do if I eat chocolate?

Chocolate contains theobromine and caffeine, which in larger amounts is especially dangerous because pets can’t break it down and eliminate it the same way humans can. It can build up to toxic concentrations and cause multi-organ disease and failure if not treated properly.

What symptoms will you see if your doggie mate eats chocolate this Easter?

Symptoms will occur from four to 24 hours after your pet has eaten chocolate and will vary depending on the amount of chocolate (theobromine) your dog has eaten. Dr Lui says, ” theobromine mainly affects the heart, central nervous system, and kidneys. Theobromine is a toxin that links to hyperactivity. Death can occur.”

Symptoms of eating chocolate are:

  • Rapid breathing
  • Muscle tension, incoordination
  • Increased heart rate
  • Blood in vomit
  • Tremors,
  • Seizure
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhoea.

KoKo’s personal tale about chocolate

If I eat chocolate, then you need to take me to the vet. The doctor will force charcoal down my throat and make me throw up (just like they did when I ate a blowfish!). They may also give intravenous fluids (a drip), medication to control heart rate, blood pressure and seizure activity.
“I WILL NOT EAT CHOCOLATE” I keep repeating this phrase if I find my Mum Helen’s stash. I do not want to sit on newspaper and be made to throw up. Sadly I know from experience that if I find a special treat I will forget all the vet’s warnings. So I keep reminding myself “I WILL NOT EAT CHOCOLATE.”
Luckily, with prompt intervention and treatment, even in dogs that have eaten large amounts of chocolate, the prognosis for a poisoned dog is usually good. If you thick that your pet has eaten chocolate, contact your nearest Vet urgently for treatment.
Edited from Greencross Vets <foryour@pethealth.greencrossvets.com.au>

Vet24HrDogs New Year’s Eve

My Mum Helen took photos of animals waiting for the Vet on New Year’s Eve. They should have been out partying but they were ill and needed attention.

It’s summer – please keep us doggies cool

Tips to Keep Your Dog Cool (courtesy of Wembley Vet Clinic)

  • Fresh water and shade are the most important things to provide relief from the heat.
  • Have 2 or more water bowls around the house in case one is knocked over.
  • Try filling small plastic paddling pools with fresh water.  Some dogs love to have a dip in the heat of the day and cool off.
  • Fill soft drink bottles with water and freeze them overnight then put it in the dog kennel.
  • Dogs will love to lay on them or lick them to keep cool
  • Hair cuts can also help to keep you long haired pets cool.  shaved to get rid of their thick coats
  • Dogs and cats cant sweat through the skin – only the pads on the feet and dogs pant to cool down
  • Fill up an ice cream container with water and add a little Vegemite to flavour it.  Pop in 1-2 dog treats.  Freeze overnight and then give it to your dog in the middle of the day – they love to lick the ice and will help keep them occupied.
Koko cool drink at the beach

Koko cool drink at the beach