KoKo and Dog mates

KoKo and Dog mates

I have been staying with my doggie mates at Mandurah again. Bro and Bonnie kept me company on walks in the park and down to the cafe every morning. Of course John and Alison, their humans, had to hold our leads.

“Spill the Beans” Cafe at Seacrest is very popular with the local dogs as the cafe sells tasty treats for us. We are lucky dogs.

At night us “Three Amigos” play “Musical Beds”, thinking that someone else’s bed is likely to be more comfortable. Some nights I creep out of my bed and lay on the floor nearer to John. He is surprised to find me in this spot in the mornings.

I always race back speedily to John when he calls me at the park, as he has an endless supply of doggie treats in his pocket.

Even though I enjoy staying with my mates nothing beats the joy of seeing my Human Mum at the door. All three of us leap over her as she arrives at the door. We slather her with kisses. I let out a sharp bark and run to our car. I stand next to the door barking loudly to ensure Mum knows I want to go back to my home in Subiaco.

Thank you John and Alison for your care and cuddles. Woofs from KoKo

KoKo’s Tips on better dog photography

  1. Photograph in natural light.
  2. Inside place your dog near a white wall within window light
  3. Clear the background of any distractions
  4. Use an aperture that creates a soft blurred background.
  5. Put a treat on top of the camera to get your dog’s attention.
  6. Ask a friend to help
  7. Get down to your pet’s level to achieve a  natural view.
  8. Use a squeaky toy, to get some eye contact.
  9. Walk your dog first to burn off excess energy
  10. Take your dog out for a big walk prior to the photo shoot, to work of fsome excess energy first.
  11. Use fabric to pad slippery surfaces.
  12. Outdoors – A high speed shot of your dog running can be dramatic. You will need an assistant to hold your dog until you are ready to call “come”

What to do if I eat chocolate?

Chocolate contains theobromine and caffeine, which in larger amounts is especially dangerous because pets can’t break it down and eliminate it the same way humans can. It can build up to toxic concentrations and cause multi-organ disease and failure if not treated properly.

What symptoms will you see if your doggie mate eats chocolate this Easter?

Symptoms will occur from four to 24 hours after your pet has eaten chocolate and will vary depending on the amount of chocolate (theobromine) your dog has eaten. Dr Lui says, ” theobromine mainly affects the heart, central nervous system, and kidneys. Theobromine is a toxin that links to hyperactivity. Death can occur.”

Symptoms of eating chocolate are:

  • Rapid breathing
  • Muscle tension, incoordination
  • Increased heart rate
  • Blood in vomit
  • Tremors,
  • Seizure
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhoea.

KoKo’s personal tale about chocolate

If I eat chocolate, then you need to take me to the vet. The doctor will force charcoal down my throat and make me throw up (just like they did when I ate a blowfish!). They may also give intravenous fluids (a drip), medication to control heart rate, blood pressure and seizure activity.
“I WILL NOT EAT CHOCOLATE” I keep repeating this phrase if I find my Mum Helen’s stash. I do not want to sit on newspaper and be made to throw up. Sadly I know from experience that if I find a special treat I will forget all the vet’s warnings. So I keep reminding myself “I WILL NOT EAT CHOCOLATE.”
Luckily, with prompt intervention and treatment, even in dogs that have eaten large amounts of chocolate, the prognosis for a poisoned dog is usually good. If you thick that your pet has eaten chocolate, contact your nearest Vet urgently for treatment.
Edited from Greencross Vets <foryour@pethealth.greencrossvets.com.au>

Animal Companions Party

We attended the AGM, waiting quietly for the treat we knew was coming afterwards. The Furbaby cafe had made a scrumptious cake which all us doggies were allowed to tuck into. You can see from the blue cream on our noses that not a lot went astray.

Furbaby cafe cake anxiously awaited

ACDogs KoKo

ACDogs KoKo

Teddy Serious

Teddy Serious

Pace finishing the last lick

Pace finishing the last lick

Just out of reach

Just out of reach

ACDog happy

ACDog happy

Demolishing the cake

Demolishing the cake

Teddy looking for cake

Teddy looking for cake

It is my Birthday!

Time for a yummy sausage sandwich in my park. My Mum spoils me!

I shared some with my doggie mates, then did my tricks for the kids. They all sang Happy Birthday KoKo.

They all sang Happy Birthday KoKo.

I am eleven years old but still sprightly. Woofs to all KoKo

Fleas – dogs pest beasties

I hate fleas. They make me scratch and I can’t concentrate on playing.

Here is a message from Wembley Vet Hospital. Woofs from KoKo

“This summer we’ve seen an increase in enquiries from clients about fleas and flea control. Perth has a perfect climate for fleas and the recent warmth and rain is bound to make things worse and not better. So this month we thought we would feature a reminder about fleas and their clever biology.

The most important concept when it comes to controlling fleas is to understand that we are not just trying to tackle the adult Flea!

The flea life cycle includes the adult flea, egg, larva, and pupa. Adult fleas do bite but cannot survive long if they are not on the dog or cat. Once the adult flea lays its eggs on the host it will fall off, leaving the eggs to go through the rest of their life cycles.

That lifecycle involves the egg hatching and moving through 3 different larval stages. The larvae look like tiny little worms that are about 1-3 mm long. These guys can crawl down under bedding, or deep into carpets, or off into cracks in the flooring or garden. This stage lasts up to 10 days.

From there, they spin themselves a web-like cocoon and can sit dormant for up to 6 months.  This pupae stage is resistant to environmental damage. They can hang around, waiting for the vibrations from pet or human movement before hatching out. This is why, if you have ever gone on holiday, when you come home, you suddenly seem to get a lot of fleas.

To adequately control fleas in your environment, you often need to tackle all stages of the life-cycle. This generally involves treating ALL the pets in the household. Did you know that about 90% of fleas found on dogs, are actually the cat variety of flea!!!

You will need to use a product that kills them WITHIN HOURS so that the flea doesn’t get a chance to feed or lay eggs.  You will need to treat ALL members of the pet household.  You may need to look at treating the environment, or else, waiting for the pets to collect up all the fleas that hatch out of the pupae stage and kill them with whatever product you choose to use.

Why control fleas you say? Flea bite hypersensitivity and flea allergic dermatitis is the most common skin disease in pets. And although the allergies usually develop when dogs and cats are young, flea allergies can begin at any age. It is the saliva from the flea that is actually believed to be the cause of the allergy or sensitivity.”

If you need advice on a safe and effective flea control product for your household, then contact

Wembley Veterinary Hospital