KoKo feeling ill

Oh dear, I feel awful, my tummy is tense with pain, I feel as if I might throw up (again) and I am not my usual bright self.

Mum thinks I ate too much last night. I kept yelling at her to give me more food.

Or maybe I found something at Leighton Beach when she was not looking.

Whatever it was, the short enjoyment I might have felt is in the past. I feel dreadful.

So when Mum took me to my favourite park and I would not even check my Wee-mails, she knew I was not pretending.

After two injections from the vet, including a painkiller, I am still not feeling well. Even peaceful sleep won’t come to me.

I hope that I can write to you tomorrow and tell you all is well.

 

I am not well

I am not well

(Certainly, Mum’s  wallet is not very well either!)

Woofs from a miserable KoKo

What to do if I eat chocolate?

Chocolate contains theobromine and caffeine, which in larger amounts is especially dangerous because pets can’t break it down and eliminate it the same way humans can. It can build up to toxic concentrations and cause multi-organ disease and failure if not treated properly.

What symptoms will you see if your doggie mate eats chocolate this Easter?

Symptoms will occur from four to 24 hours after your pet has eaten chocolate and will vary depending on the amount of chocolate (theobromine) your dog has eaten. Dr Lui says, ” theobromine mainly affects the heart, central nervous system, and kidneys. Theobromine is a toxin that links to hyperactivity. Death can occur.”

Symptoms of eating chocolate are:

  • Rapid breathing
  • Muscle tension, incoordination
  • Increased heart rate
  • Blood in vomit
  • Tremors,
  • Seizure
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhoea.

KoKo’s personal tale about chocolate

If I eat chocolate, then you need to take me to the vet. The doctor will force charcoal down my throat and make me throw up (just like they did when I ate a blowfish!). They may also give intravenous fluids (a drip), medication to control heart rate, blood pressure and seizure activity.
“I WILL NOT EAT CHOCOLATE” I keep repeating this phrase if I find my Mum Helen’s stash. I do not want to sit on newspaper and be made to throw up. Sadly I know from experience that if I find a special treat I will forget all the vet’s warnings. So I keep reminding myself “I WILL NOT EAT CHOCOLATE.”
Luckily, with prompt intervention and treatment, even in dogs that have eaten large amounts of chocolate, the prognosis for a poisoned dog is usually good. If you thick that your pet has eaten chocolate, contact your nearest Vet urgently for treatment.
Edited from Greencross Vets <foryour@pethealth.greencrossvets.com.au>

It’s summer – please keep us doggies cool

Tips to Keep Your Dog Cool (courtesy of Wembley Vet Clinic)

  • Fresh water and shade are the most important things to provide relief from the heat.
  • Have 2 or more water bowls around the house in case one is knocked over.
  • Try filling small plastic paddling pools with fresh water.  Some dogs love to have a dip in the heat of the day and cool off.
  • Fill soft drink bottles with water and freeze them overnight then put it in the dog kennel.
  • Dogs will love to lay on them or lick them to keep cool
  • Hair cuts can also help to keep you long haired pets cool.  shaved to get rid of their thick coats
  • Dogs and cats cant sweat through the skin – only the pads on the feet and dogs pant to cool down
  • Fill up an ice cream container with water and add a little Vegemite to flavour it.  Pop in 1-2 dog treats.  Freeze overnight and then give it to your dog in the middle of the day – they love to lick the ice and will help keep them occupied.
Koko cool drink at the beach

Koko cool drink at the beach

Oh No! Off to the vet again

It’s not really too bad going to see Greg the vet now that I am older.

Today I even tried to jump the queue and rushed into the consulting room when I spied him as he opened the consulting room door. He said “KoKo please sit down, it is not your turn yet.So I turned a little red and slunk back to the floor to wait.

No dog likes the private treatment Greg has to give me for my itchy bottom BBut I felt much more comfortable afterwards.

Thank you, Greg.

While we were waiting at the Vets we met this wise looking fellow called Ralph.

Woofs from KoKo

Ralph at the Subiaco Vet

Ralph at the Subiaco Vet

Poisonous plants for dogs to avoid

Thank you to Wembley Vet Clinic for this handy information.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

KoKo waiting his Puppicino at Floyds Cafe

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  1. Azaleas and rhododendrons contain toxins that may cause vomiting, diarrhoea, coma, and potentially even death.
  2. Tulip and daffodil bulbs cause serious stomach problems, convulsions, and increased heart rate.
  3. Cycads are highly toxic. A single seed may result in vomiting, seizures and liver failure – usually irreversible.
  4. Cape lilac berries are toxic to dogs (and people).  GI upsets like nausea, drooling, appetite loss, vomiting, belly pain, and diarrhoea. Also lethargy and weakness and a “drunken” or wobbly gait. With severe intoxications, changes to their breathing, heartbeat, tremors, collapse and seizures.
  5. Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow, is a popular hedging plant in WA with purple flowers that fade too white.  If eaten it can cause muscle spasms, convulsions similar to strychnine poisoning and could potentially cause death within just a few hours.   when pruning every leaf and stem should be discarded.
  6. Wandering Jew is a common weed and ground cover in WA gardens. It can cause significant skin irritation and a nasty rash.

    So… don’t nibble your Mum or Dad’s plants or you may become very sick.

Dog food is much more tasty and healthy too. KoKo Potter

Can you understand me?

Thanks to Dr Greg from Subiaco Vet for some more tips!

 When I wag my tail – I am smiling!  But, if my tail is high and wagging slowly, I am feeling confident and friendly, whereas if I hold my tail low and wag it rapidly, it means i am a little nervous.
 When I am scooting or dragging my bottom on the ground I am itchy and probably have blocked anal glands. Mum knows to take me to Dr Greg.
 Licking – Most common reasons for licking ourselves and other dogs is that they taste good, and we are trying to show affection
 WHen you arrive home and I bring you a toy I am giving you a gift that I think you will like. It is a sign of my affection.

KoKo

Koko Nik Natanui

Thank you Greg for putting my photo in your newsletter. Everyone knows I am a keen Eagles supporter.

Winter Warnings and Advice on Aging from Wembley Veterinary Hospital

Old age creaks

Old age creaks

Aging How does ageing affect older pets?  As a cat or dog ages, two common changes can occur. The first are age-related changes such as hearing loss, changes in vision or reduced activity.  These are normal and cannot be prevented.

The second kind is related to what we would class as disease. Commonly this would include heart disease, liver disease, kidney disease, arthritis or dental disease. Often, these types of diseases can start to develop slowly, so we often make excuses or allowances for our pets getting old and miss the warning signs. The signs to look out for can include things like weight gain or loss, changes in water intake or urine output, smelly breath or difficulty chewing, increase or decrease in appetite and changes in activity levels or sleeping more than normal.

Comments from KoKo

“I’ve already told my Mum that i don’t want a CAT scan when I get older. I am scared of cats and don’t see why I should have a cat charge Mum a lot of money for just walking around me in a circle.”

“I’m not having any LAB tests either. I hear that Labrador are not all that clever so I doubt it would be worthwhile paying for their opinion. (sorry to offend any Labs!)” KoKo

Snail Pellet Poisoning

The first rains of spring often bring out that first flush of snails into the garden. Snail pellets are highly toxic and can kill Dogs and Cats by causing muscle excitement, salivation and seizures. Take care of you dog when he/she is out walking as well as in your own yard.

Tips to care for your doggies and moggies in Bushfire risk areas

Tips from the CFA

Decide if you will keep your pets with you or move them elsewhere during fire risk days. The safest place to be is away from high-risk bushfire areas.

  • If you choose to stay – confine your pets early inside a secure room, on a lead or in a carrier, clearly labelled with your contact details
  • Have wet towels and woollen blankets to cover and protect your pets
  • Have plenty of water for them to drink
  • Make sure your pet is micro-chipped and wearing an identification tag
  • Ensure all contact information is current
  • Link an emergency contact in a different suburb to your records
  • List where you could house your pets if you decide to leave early e.g. boarding kennel or a relative/friend’s place
  • Ask neighbours to protect your pets if you are not at home during a bushfire
  • Keep in contact with your neighbours to let them know your plans
  • Keep your bushfire relocation kit for pets within easy reach
  • Practise how you will move your pets if you leave. It takes longer than you think

Your Pet Bushfire Relocation Kit should include:

  • Food and water
  • A bowl for each pet
  • A second collar and lead
  • A carrier for cats and smaller pets
  • Bedding and a woollen blanket
  • A pet first-aid kit – seek your vet’s advice
  • Their favourite toy
  • Any medications, and details of what they are
  • Your pet’s medical history, including proof of vaccination
  • Your vet’s contact details

Warning signs of hyperthermia:

Heat stress in dogs and cats occurs when they are unable to maintain their normal body temperature. Warning signs are:

  • Excessive panting
  • If severe they will vomit
  • Salivating
  • Whining or agitation
  • KoKo-Keeping Cool

    KoKo-Keeping Cool

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tips for keeping pets cool

  • Fresh, cold water available at all times
  • Shade or bring them inside into a cool room
  • Wipe down with a cool, damp towel or leave wet towels out for them to lie on
  • A wading pool for your dog if it will use it
  • For cats, rub damp hands over their coat or tummy
  • Ice blocks in your pet’s water bowl
  • Ice in a pillow case and place it nearby
  • Have your dog clipped if their coat is long and thick
  • Never leave your pets in a vehicle on a hot day

Register your pet on the National Pet Register with its Microchip number

Woofs from KoKo

Tips for noticing Arthritis in your dog early

We all grow old, or as I like to think of it,our bodies show the signs of our life experiences.

My Mum has helped me stay as healthy as I can, we exercise at least twice a day.

We are both amazed that my weight is the same as when i was one year old. Mum is generous with her treats but only lets me have small serves.

Of course I’m about a kilo heavier before I go to Wembley Vet for my fluffy hair cut!

Here are some tips on picking up early signs of arthritis in your dogs joints. Woofs from KoKo

Arthritis In Your Pet

Woofs from KoKo